New York Times: Daily Blunder

The New York Times is going to feature your blog on its home page, and you’ve been asked to publish a new post — it’ll be the first thing tens of thousands of new readers see. Write it.

Right. Cause that’s going to happen. I looked at my stats, recently, in the light of my blogiversary, and I am not happy to give you the results: my readership is declining. I am old news.

When I started out, last year in August, I got more views in half a month than in either of my last three months of blogging. September was a blast, my only month with over 500 views. Sure, I wrote a post every day, then, sometimes even two, with a record of four in a day. Now, I’m lucky when I manage to write one every week.

"Why don’t you go back to writing one every day?" I hear you asking, "surely, your views will increase if you write more". Yeah, probably. I’m just not feeling it, now, though. A lot of posts were about myself, directly or indirectly, and it’s not easy finding a new facet of myself to write about. "Why don’t you write about something else?" Like to. I’ve considered writing some more fiction on my blog, and political commentary, and some other stuff, but in order to do that, I myself would need to do some more reading. I just pretend to know stuff, but I do try to remain plausible and informed, because (at least) half of pretending is doing it right. And since I’ve got a job, with ~50 h a week, well, there’s only so much time to spare for my hobby.

Also, a lot of bloggers that I’ve met in the first few months don’t seem to blog anymore. I have been sort of negligent, not looking for more followers actively. As you all know, every follower you aim to recruit is a lot of work. It’s a social activity, really. It’s like finding a new best friend. And those bloggers whom I follow, and vice-verso, I do consider internet best friends, because it is almost unavoidable when you delve into someone’s thoughts for months and open yourself to them, in return – even though I don’t comment much on some of these best friends’ posts anymore.

But, don’t despair, for I certainly am not. I have some vacation coming up, soon. Maybe I can restore some of my old posting glory in those two weeks (October) and get back to 200+ views for a month.

Do me a solid and tune in, then

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6 thoughts on “New York Times: Daily Blunder

  1. ‘it’s not easy finding a new facet of myself to write about’… exactly! I also feel that blogging is a very burst-like activity for that reason. When I started my first pseudo-blogs more than 10 years ago I had written lots of articles in a short time – but of course they were based on things I had been mulling about for another 10 years before! i
    I don’t want to turn into somebody who actively searches for content to ‘blog about’.

  2. “And those bloggers whom I follow, and vice-verso, I do consider internet best friends, because it is almost unavoidable when you delve into someone’s thoughts for months and open yourself to them”

    You raise an interesting point. Some of my internet followers know me better than some good friends. Most of my good friends don’t bother to read everything (or even anything) I post. Strange to think that a stranger over the other side of the world can know my thoughts better than someone I know and see regularly.

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